News

New eatery to open at former site of Karen’s Kitchen

Friday, March 11, 2011

By ANGELA HUGHES

Correspondent

Fine dining is about to return to Bedford in one of the most talked about locations last year.

Located at 170 Route 101, the building and restaurant formerly known as Karen’s Kitchen is now owned and operated by Matt Trottier of Bedford.

Tek “Nique” is on target to open in early April and will offer fine dining in a hip setting.

Pretty much anything you remembered of Karen’s Kitchen has been demolished.

New walls, funky paint, trendy tile and a fresh palate of colors including shades of cinnamon and navy now adorn the restaurant.

“We hired a designer who came up with a floor plan, we tweaked it a little bit and love how the floor plan works so well,” Trottier said.

“You are not stepping into a fish bowl now. There is much more room than you would have expected. There will be a function room for wine and menu tasting and a beautiful wine and liquor closet. A brand new bar exists where the previous ice cream bar was.”

On the menu is a host of tantalizing entrees including jumbo sea scallops, apple braised rabbit, roasted eggplant ravioli and a pan-roasted rib eye of beef with grilled shallots and king oyster mushrooms, served with a side of brandy jus and parmesan whipped potatoes, Trottier said.

As a youth, Trottier started off as a dish washer at the Bedford Village Inn working by the side of his uncle who was chef.

He attended The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y.

He then cooked for big names in New Hampshire, including the Inn at Little Washington, C.R. Sparks, Bedford Village Inn, Michael Timothy’s Urban Bistro and Wine Bar, Georgio’s Ristorante & Martini and Stonehedge Inn in Massachusetts.

Taking a break for several years, Trottier bought and sold real estate waiting for the perfect spot to open up and it finally did when Karen’s Kitchen closed.

“This was a perfect opportunity for us and because we live so close by – it was just the right time and made sense.”

Trottier and his wife, Kristine, owner of 101 Salon, saw the moment and jumped on it immediately.

Owning a restaurant teaches you many lessons, Trottier said.

“You really have to know your team. You are only as good as your employees,” he said.

He hopes to hire 20-25 local people in the next month to assist in running the restaurant.

“It is also so important to make sure that the ingredients are up to par and you buy the best that you can get,” Trottier said. “Your produce needs to be excellent from day one. You need to order and present the best to your customers.”

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