Girl Scouting a positive influence on girls of all ages

BEDFORD – At an age when many are struggling to find themselves, Allyssa Tamblingson was already an active Brownie Girl Scout, eager to experience her next adventure while leaving her mark on the world around her.
By age 8, she was already seeing and experiencing more than other girls her age, studying sea life at a nearby aquarium and helping community members in need.
Now a counselor at Camp Kettleford in Bedford, the 21-year-old Merrimack resident will soon enter her senior year at Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I., where she majors in psychology and hopes to eventually teach children with autism.
Tamblingson joined Girl Scouts as a Brownie and continued through junior high school as a Junior and Cadette. As a member, she visited churches in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., learning about different faiths; delivered meals to and raked leaves for her homebound neighbors; and once even spent the night at Ripley’s Aquarium of Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Along the way, Tamblingson collected dozens of pins and badges, each one holding memories of an experience that helped mold her into the confident young woman she has become.
"I have a whole bin of patches that never actually made it onto my sash," she said with a laugh. "There just wasn’t enough room."
This is Tamblingson’s first summer working as a Girl Scout camp counselor. She said her favorite part of the job is working with larger groups of girls – it hearkens to her childhood days when she learned that there really is strength in numbers.
Then and now, she notes that Girl Scouting has always been "such a dynamic experience."
"I just love the fact that everything is girl-led and girls can exercise their independence by deciding what they like to do," Tamblingson said. "I think the biggest thing I learned from Girl Scouts was how to come out of my shell. It’s truly a judgement-free zone here."
Indeed, Girl Scout programs have a proven history of keeping girls on the right track. Girl Scout Research Institute studies indicate Girl Scouts helps girls perform better academically and socially by teaching them important leadership skills such as problem-solving, resourcefulness and challenge-seeking. These improvements were consistent, regardless of girls’ social or economic background.
In her daily interactions with campers, Tamblingson said she’s constantly observing girls who may have arrived at camp feeling rather shy, but are gradually "feeling comfortable enough to open up to one another.
"Whenever I ask the kids what their favorite part of camp is, the answer is always the same," she said. "They say, ‘I made a new friend today!’ "
Organizations like Girl Scouts give girls a sense of community and belonging; the program’s steady presence in New Hampshire and Vermont has no doubt contributed to promising findings in two recent studies on the nation’s youth. According to statistics compiled for the 2015 Kids Count Data Book, New Hampshire ranks second in the nation in terms of overall child well-being.
New Hampshire ranked first in Family and Community and Vermont ranked third, a testament that communities with strong resources and programs for its youths ultimately helps them to thrive.
The Kids Count data is consistent with a 2014 study conducted by GSRI in which New Hampshire was ranked first and Vermont ranked fifth among Best States for a Girl to Live.
"Today’s world can be a challenging place, but Girl Scouts empowers girls to rise to those challenges," said Patricia Mellor, chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains. "Our strong, ever-growing presence in New Hampshire and Vermont will help ensure a high quality of life for girls in those states in the years to come."
For more information about Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains’ unique, girl-led programs, visit girlscoutsgwm.org or call 1-888-474-9686.

Girl Scouting a positive influence on girls of all ages

BEDFORD – At an age when many are struggling to find themselves, Allyssa Tamblingson was already an active Brownie Girl Scout, eager to experience her next adventure while leaving her mark on the world around her.
By age 8, she was already seeing and experiencing more than other girls her age, studying sea life at a nearby aquarium and helping community members in need.
Now a counselor at Camp Kettleford in Bedford, the 21-year-old Merrimack resident will soon enter her senior year at Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I., where she majors in psychology and hopes to eventually teach children with autism.
Tamblingson joined Girl Scouts as a Brownie and continued through junior high school as a Junior and Cadette. As a member, she visited churches in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., learning about different faiths; delivered meals to and raked leaves for her homebound neighbors; and once even spent the night at Ripley’s Aquarium of Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Along the way, Tamblingson collected dozens of pins and badges, each one holding memories of an experience that helped mold her into the confident young woman she has become.
"I have a whole bin of patches that never actually made it onto my sash," she said with a laugh. "There just wasn’t enough room."
This is Tamblingson’s first summer working as a Girl Scout camp counselor. She said her favorite part of the job is working with larger groups of girls – it hearkens to her childhood days when she learned that there really is strength in numbers.
Then and now, she notes that Girl Scouting has always been "such a dynamic experience."
"I just love the fact that everything is girl-led and girls can exercise their independence by deciding what they like to do," Tamblingson said. "I think the biggest thing I learned from Girl Scouts was how to come out of my shell. It’s truly a judgement-free zone here."
Indeed, Girl Scout programs have a proven history of keeping girls on the right track. Girl Scout Research Institute studies indicate Girl Scouts helps girls perform better academically and socially by teaching them important leadership skills such as problem-
solving, resourcefulness and challenge-seeking. These improvements were consistent, regardless of girls’ social or economic background.
In her daily interactions with campers, Tamblingson said she’s constantly observing girls who may have arrived at camp feeling rather shy, but are gradually "feeling comfortable enough to open up to one another.
"Whenever I ask the kids what their favorite part of camp is, the answer is always the same," she said. "They say, ‘I made a new friend today!’ "
Organizations like Girl Scouts give girls a sense of community and belonging; the program’s steady presence in New Hampshire and Vermont has no doubt contributed to promising findings in two recent studies on the nation’s youth. According to statistics compiled for the 2015 Kids Count Data Book, New Hampshire ranks second in the nation in terms of overall child well-being.
New Hampshire ranked first in Family and Community and Vermont ranked third, a testament that communities with strong resources and programs for its youths ultimately helps them to thrive.
The Kids Count data is consistent with a 2014 study conducted by GSRI in which New Hampshire was ranked first and Vermont ranked fifth among Best States for a Girl to Live.
"Today’s world can be a challenging place, but Girl Scouts empowers girls to rise to those challenges," said Patricia Mellor, chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains. "Our strong, ever-growing presence in New Hampshire and Vermont will help ensure a high quality of life for girls in those states in the years to come."
For more information about Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains’ unique, girl-led programs, visit girlscoutsgwm.org or call 1-888-474-9686.

Girl Scouting a positive influence on girls of all ages

BEDFORD – At an age when many are struggling to find themselves, Allyssa Tamblingson was already an active Brownie Girl Scout, eager to experience her next adventure while leaving her mark on the world around her.
By age 8, she was already seeing and experiencing more than other girls her age, studying sea life at a nearby aquarium and helping community members in need.
Now a counselor at Camp Kettleford in Bedford, the 21-year-old Merrimack resident will soon enter her senior year at Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I., where she majors in psychology and hopes to eventually teach children with autism.
Tamblingson joined Girl Scouts as a Brownie and continued through junior high school as a Junior and Cadette. As a member, she visited churches in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., learning about different faiths; delivered meals to and raked leaves for her homebound neighbors; and once even spent the night at Ripley’s Aquarium of Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Along the way, Tamblingson collected dozens of pins and badges, each one holding memories of an experience that helped mold her into the confident young woman she has become.
"I have a whole bin of patches that never actually made it onto my sash," she said with a laugh. "There just wasn’t enough room."
This is Tamblingson’s first summer working as a Girl Scout camp counselor. She said her favorite part of the job is working with larger groups of girls – it hearkens to her childhood days when she learned that there really is strength in numbers.
Then and now, she notes that Girl Scouting has always been "such a dynamic experience."
"I just love the fact that everything is girl-led and girls can exercise their independence by deciding what they like to do," Tamblingson said. "I think the biggest thing I learned from Girl Scouts was how to come out of my shell. It’s truly a judgement
-free zone here."
Indeed, Girl Scout programs have a proven history of keeping girls on the right track. Girl Scout Research Institute studies indicate Girl Scouts helps girls perform better academically and socially by teaching them important leadership skills such as problem-solving, resourcefulness and challenge-seeking. These improvements were consistent, regardless of girls’ social or economic background.
In her daily interactions with campers, Tamblingson said she’s constantly observing girls who may have arrived at camp feeling rather shy, but are gradually "feeling comfortable enough to open up to one another.
"Whenever I ask the kids what their favorite part of camp is, the answer is always the same," she said. "They say, ‘I made a new friend today!’ "
Organizations like Girl Scouts give girls a sense of community and belonging; the program’s steady presence in New Hampshire and Vermont has no doubt contributed to promising findings in two recent studies on the nation’s youth. According to statistics compiled for the 2015 Kids Count Data Book, New Hampshire ranks second in the nation in terms of overall child well-being.
New Hampshire ranked first in Family and Community and Vermont ranked third, a testament that communities with strong resources and programs for its youths ultimately helps them to thrive.
The Kids Count data is consistent with a 2014 study conducted by GSRI in which New Hampshire was ranked first and Vermont ranked fifth among Best States for a Girl to Live.
"Today’s world can be a challenging place, but Girl Scouts empowers girls to rise to those challenges," said Patricia Mellor, chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains. "Our strong, ever-
growing presence in New Hampshire and Vermont will help ensure a high quality of life for girls in those states in the years to come."
For more information about Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains’ unique, girl-led programs, visit girlscoutsgwm.org or call 1-888-474-9686.