Keep calm and carry herbs

HOLLIS – When Tiffany Coroka Gillen was a stressed-out teenager, with anxiety that tied "my stomach in knots," she dis­covered the value of herbs.

During a recent workshop at Beaver Brook in Hollis called "Keep Calm & Carry Herbs," Gillen talked about how herbs became her best friend, a way to "take the edge off," that had no negative side effects.

Native Americans learned about the medicinal value of herbs through trial and error, she said, and their values that have been confirmed through "tons of research."

Rosemary, for example, is not only a brain stimulate that helps people focus, it is also mood mel­lowing and an anti-oxidant that helped her sister’s migraine head­aches by increasing blood flow to the brain.

Lavender is a sleep aid and an anti-depressant.

The soothing scent "is like put­ting a warm blanket on" and it also relieves the pain of bee stings and other histamine reactions, part of its "broad spectrum of awesome­ness" that includes anti-spasmatic properties.

Hyssop is another calming herb. "Sit and smell hyssop for awhile and you will get drowsy."

Gillen took the 13 women, who came from as far as Portsmouth and Allenstown to take the class, for a stroll outside among Beaver Brook’s extensive herb gardens, encouraging them to sniff the plants’ aromas.

Back inside, she prepared ver­bena tea and passed it around.

The perennial lemon verbena is "uplifting," while lemon balm, a mint, relaxes you and wakes you up at the same time, causing peo­ple to be mellow while also being more sensitive to their surround­ings, she said.

Also recommended for stress-release, she said, are a 10-minute walk or deep-muscle stretches, "instead of sitting and having the stress turn into fat."

Another valuable plant is holy basil, from India, also known as tulsi, which Gillen said lowers blood sugar, reduces fevers and is an anti-inflammatory.

The workshop on herbal med­icine was one of four that Gillen, who is working on her master’s degree in environmental science at Antioch University, given at Beaver Brook this summer.

Near the end of the three-hour session on Aug. 20 Gillen showed the women how to pre­pare a tincture of chamomile, us­ing vodka or apple cider vinegar as the base.

Kathy Cleveland can be reached at 673-3100 or kcleveland@cabinet.com.

Keep calm and carry herbs

HOLLIS – When Tiffany Coroka Gillen was a stressed-out teenager, with anxiety that tied "my stomach in knots," she discovered the value of herbs.

During a recent workshop at Beaver Brook in Hollis called "Keep Calm & Carry Herbs," Gillen talked about how herbs became her best friend, a way to "take the edge off," that had no negative side effects.

Native Americans learned about the medicinal value of herbs through trial and error, she said, and their values that have been confirmed through "tons of research."

Rosemary, for example, is not only a brain stimulate that helps people focus, it is also mood mellowing and an anti-oxidant that helped her sister’s migraine headaches by increasing blood flow to the brain.

Lavender is a sleep aid and an anti-depressant.

The soothing scent "is like putting a warm blanket on" and it also relieves the pain of bee stings and other histamine reactions, part of its "broad spectrum of awesomeness" that includes anti-spasmatic proper­ties.

Hyssop is another calming herb. "Sit and smell hyssop for awhile and you will get drowsy."

Gillen took the 13 women, who came from as far as Ports­mouth and Allenstown to take the class, for a stroll outside among Beaver Brook’s extensive herb gardens, encouraging them to sniff the plants’ aromas.

Back inside, she prepared ver­bena tea and passed it around.

The perennial lemon verbena is "uplifting," while lemon balm, a mint, relaxes you and wakes you up at the same time, causing people to be mellow while also being more sensitive to their surroundings, she said.

Also recommended for stress-release, she said, are a 10-minute walk or deep-muscle stretches, "instead of sitting and having the stress turn into fat."

Another valuable plant is holy basil, from India, also known as tulsi, which Gillen said lowers blood sugar, reduces fevers and is an anti-inflammatory.

The workshop on herbal medicine was one of four that Gillen, who is working on her master’s degree in environmen­tal science at Antioch Universi­ty, given at Beaver Brook this summer.

Near the end of the three-hour session on Aug. 20 Gillen showed the women how to pre­pare a tincture of chamomile, using vodka or apple cider vine­gar as the base.

Kathy Cleveland can be reached at 673-3100 or kcleveland@cabinet.com

Keep calm and carry herbs

HOLLIS – When Tiffany Coroka Gillen was a stressed-out teenager, with anxiety that tied "my stomach in knots," she discovered the value of herbs.

During a recent workshop at Beaver Brook in Hollis called "Keep Calm & Carry Herbs," Gillen talked about how herbs became her best friend, a way to "take the edge off," that had no negative side effects.

Native Americans learned about the medicinal value of herbs through trial and error, she said, and their values that have been confirmed through "tons of research."

Rosemary, for example, is not only a brain stimulate that helps people focus, it is also mood mellowing and an anti-oxidant that helped her sister’s migraine headaches by increasing blood flow to the brain.

Lavender is a sleep aid and an anti-depressant.

The soothing scent "is like putting a warm blanket on" and it also relieves the pain of bee stings and other histamine reactions, part of its "broad spectrum of awesomeness" that includes anti-spasmatic proper­ties.

Hyssop is another calming herb. "Sit and smell hyssop for awhile and you will get drowsy."

Gillen took the 13 women, who came from as far as Ports­mouth and Allenstown to take the class, for a stroll outside among Beaver Brook’s extensive herb gardens, encouraging them to sniff the plants’ aromas.

Back inside, she prepared ver­bena tea and passed it around.

The perennial lemon verbena is "uplifting," while lemon balm, a mint, relaxes you and wakes you up at the same time, causing people to be mellow while also being more sensitive to their surroundings, she said.

Also recommended for stress-release, she said, are a 10-minute walk or deep-muscle stretches, "instead of sitting and having the stress turn into fat."

Another valuable plant is holy basil, from India, also known as tulsi, which Gillen said lowers blood sugar, reduces fevers and is an anti-inflammatory.

The workshop on herbal medicine was one of four that Gillen, who is working on her master’s degree in environmen­tal science at Antioch Universi­ty, given at Beaver Brook this summer.

Near the end of the three-hour session on Aug. 20 Gillen showed the women how to pre­pare a tincture of chamomile, using vodka or apple cider vine­gar as the base.

Kathy Cleveland can be reached at 673-3100 or kcleveland@cabinet.com