Wilton woman creates unique items from bones, feathers

WILTON – It is difficult to describe what artist Amy Borlaug does because she does so many different, although related, things.

It is part taxidermy. She tans hides and cleans and preserves bones and skulls for museums and schools.

It is the creation of delicate jewelry from bones and feathers.

And it is honoring her Micmac ancestors of upper Canada through the creation of implements used in sacred and traditional rituals.

Borlaug demonstrated a large fan made from the wing of a wild turkey.

"It’s a smudger," she said, "used to direct the sacred smoke."

She also had a much smaller one used in other ceremonies.

To prepare bones and skulls for museum display, and for students of anatomy, she removes the flesh as far as she can and then uses dermestid beetles to clean the rest.

"They naturally clean and degrease," she said, leaving the bones smooth and white and ready to be preserved.

The beetles do not disturb the bone, leaving all of the attendant structures for study.

Her clients include local sportsmen wanting to preserve antlers or skull as trophies, and creating mounted pieces for museums. She is the only such artist in New England, and her clients are nationwide.

Borlaug said her most exotic piece was an armadillo from Texas.

She has recently begun making jewelry, and pointed out a delicate pair of earrings made with the vertebrae of a snake and feathers.

"Big and flashy and tiny and delicate," she said.

Borlaug said she has been making Native American objects for about 10 years, beginning her LLunna’s Natural Creations, in 2005. She recently moved into the Riverview Mills on Howard Street.

"I do the bone cleaning in my barn," she said. "It’s kind of smelly. This is like a showroom."

Much of her work is commission, including people who wish to preserve part or all of a pet.

For schools, she will prepare all of the bones, which students much then reassemble with wire.

"Like they do the dinosaurs," she said.

Borlaug previously lived in Nashua, and she has worked as wildlife rehabilitator, which she still does sometimes.

"I worked at the (former) Greenville Wildlife Park," she said. "I got to take care of the baby white tigers."

LLunna’s Natural Creations can be reached at 759-8266.

Wilton woman creates unique items from bones, feathers

WILTON – It is difficult to describe what artist Amy Borlaug does because she does so many different, although related, things.

It is part taxidermy. She tans hides and cleans and preserves bones and skulls for museums and schools.

It is the creation of delicate jewelry from bones and feathers.

And it is honoring her Micmac ancestors of upper Canada through the creation of implements used in sacred and traditional rituals.

Borlaug demonstrated a large fan made from the wing of a wild turkey.

"It’s a smudger," she said, "used to direct the sacred smoke."

She also had a much smaller one used in other ceremonies.

To prepare bones and skulls for museum display, and for students of anatomy, she removes the flesh as far as she can and then uses dermestid beetles to clean the rest.

"They naturally clean and degrease," she said, leaving the bones smooth and white and ready to be preserved.

The beetles do not disturb the bone, leaving all of the attendant structures for study.

Her clients include local sportsmen wanting to preserve antlers or skull as trophies, and creating mounted pieces for museums. She is the only such artist in New England, and her clients are nationwide.

Borlaug said her most exotic piece was an armadillo from Texas.

She has recently begun making jewelry, and pointed out a delicate pair of earrings made with the vertebrae of a snake and feathers.

"Big and flashy and tiny and delicate," she said.

Borlaug said she has been making Native American objects for about 10 years, beginning her LLunna’s Natural Creations, in 2005. She recently moved into the Riverview Mills on Howard Street.

"I do the bone cleaning in my barn," she said. "It’s kind of smelly. This is like a showroom."

Much of her work is commission, including people who wish to preserve part or all of a pet.

For schools, she will prepare all of the bones, which students much then reassemble with wire.

"Like they do the dinosaurs," she said.

Borlaug previously lived in Nashua, and she has worked as wildlife rehabilitator, which she still does sometimes.

"I worked at the (former) Greenville Wildlife Park," she said. "I got to take care of the baby white tigers."

LLunna’s Natural Creations can be reached at 759-8266.

Wilton woman creates unique items from bones, feathers

WILTON – It is difficult to describe what artist Amy Borlaug does because she does so many different, although related, things.

It is part taxidermy. She tans hides and cleans and preserves bones and skulls for museums and schools.

It is the creation of delicate jewelry from bones and feathers.

And it is honoring her Micmac ancestors of upper Canada through the creation of implements used in sacred and traditional rituals.

Borlaug demonstrated a large fan made from the wing of a wild turkey.

"It’s a smudger," she said, "used to direct the sacred smoke."

She also had a much smaller one used in other ceremonies.

To prepare bones and skulls for museum display, and for students of anatomy, she removes the flesh as far as she can and then uses dermestid beetles to clean the rest.

"They naturally clean and degrease," she said, leaving the bones smooth and white and ready to be preserved.

The beetles do not disturb the bone, leaving all of the attendant structures for study.

Her clients include local sportsmen wanting to preserve antlers or skull as trophies, and creating mounted pieces for museums. She is the only such artist in New England, and her clients are nationwide.

Borlaug said her most exotic piece was an armadillo from Texas.

She has recently begun making jewelry, and pointed out a delicate pair of earrings made with the vertebrae of a snake and feathers.

"Big and flashy and tiny and delicate," she said.

Borlaug said she has been making Native American objects for about 10 years, beginning her LLunna’s Natural Creations, in 2005. She recently moved into the Riverview Mills on Howard Street.

"I do the bone cleaning in my barn," she said. "It’s kind of smelly. This is like a showroom."

Much of her work is commission, including people who wish to preserve part or all of a pet.

For schools, she will prepare all of the bones, which students much then reassemble with wire.

"Like they do the dinosaurs," she said.

Borlaug previously lived in Nashua, and she has worked as wildlife rehabilitator, which she still does sometimes.

"I worked at the (former) Greenville Wildlife Park," she said. "I got to take care of the baby white tigers."

LLunna’s Natural Creations can be reached at 759-8266.