Plenty to see at Sustainability Fair

SWILTON – A misty, drizzly Earth Day drew hundreds of visitors on Saturday, April 22, to talk with the dozens of exhibitors and hear a variety of speakers at the Souhegan Sustainability Fair. The displays that filled the Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative High School gym and covered almost every aspect of being good to the Earth and making the most of what is here. In one corner, Sommer Valentine, of Local Share on Main Street, a part of Plowshare Farm in Greenfield, was weaving a sturdy, colorful fabric from which the group will make fashionable tote bags. Her materials were cotton yarn and strips of plastic grocery bags. Across the gym, Mike Griffin, of Four Seasons Aquaponics, was explaining growing vegetables in tanks of water fertilized by fish; the tilapia inside the tank are also a product. Griffin shares Ledge Top Farm on Center Road with Tom Mitchell. In between were garden clubs from Amherst and Milford; conservation commissions from Wilton and Amherst; the Souhegan Watershed Association and the Souhegan River Advisory Council; Gaia Educational Outreach, a new venture of 4-Corners Farm; the Souhegan Valley Food Co-op; several farms and growers of herbs; and land trusts and outreach organizations. The Wilton Peace Action Committee offered ways to reuse items and “keep it out of the landfill” by turning such things as paper rollers, lint, mesh bags and prescription bottles into plant markers, birdfeeders, nesting material for birds and craft items. It also provided the proper ways to recycle everything possible, from electronics and batteries to building materials and even children’s car seats. From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. a series of presentations was offered covering topics such as climate change, emergency preparedness, bobcats, solar power, saving farmland, green burials, work-based education and wild pollinators. Workshops were offered on composting with worms, works of the Rise-Up Center, and roundtable discussions led by the Wilton Energy Committee and New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions. Live music was provided throughout the event by Amy Conley and the Kukeleles, Bob Baker, Song of the Lark, Milford Contra Dance Band, Joelinda, Decatur Creek and storyteller Papa Joe. At 5 p.m., people were invited to High Mowing School to hike around the Frye Farm fields and to stay for a session with the New Hampshire Astronomy Association for a view of the night sky. The fair was sponsored by the Wilton Conservation Commission, and was funded by New England Grassroots Environmental Funds. Other promoters were W.S. Packaging, Nashua Regional Planning Commission, House by the Side of the Road, TDS Telecom, Wilton Energy Committee and Monadnock Water. The fair committee members were Sandy Lafleur, Alisha Demasi, Jennifer Beck, Alyana Vergo and Alison Meltzer. The Souhegan Sustainability Fair is held by a nonprofit committee dedicated to more social and responsible living.

WILTON – A misty, drizzly Earth Day drew hundreds of visitors on Saturday, April 22, to talk with the dozens of exhibitors and hear a variety of speakers at the Souhegan Sustainability Fair.

The displays that filled the

Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative High School gym and covered almost every aspect of being good to the Earth and making the most of what is here.

In one corner, Sommer Valentine, of Local Share on Main Street, a part of Plowshare Farm in Greenfield, was weaving a sturdy, colorful fabric from which the group will make fashionable tote bags. Her materials were cotton yarn and strips of plastic grocery bags.

Across the gym, Mike Griffin, of Four Seasons Aquaponics, was explaining growing vegetables in tanks of water fertilized by fish; the tilapia inside the tank are also a product. Griffin shares Ledge Top Farm on Center Road with Tom Mitchell.

In between were garden clubs from Amherst and Milford; conservation commissions from Wilton and Amherst; the Souhegan Watershed Association and the Souhegan River Advisory Council; Gaia Educational Outreach, a new venture of 4-Corners Farm; the Souhegan Valley Food Co-op; several farms and growers of herbs; and land trusts and outreach organizations.

The Wilton Peace Action Committee offered ways to reuse items and “keep it out of the landfill” by turning such things as paper rollers, lint, mesh bags and prescription bottles into plant markers, birdfeeders, nesting material for birds and craft items. It also provided the proper ways to recycle everything possible, from electronics and batteries to building materials and even children’s car seats.

From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. a series of presentations was offered covering topics such as climate change, emergency preparedness, bobcats, solar power, saving farmland, green burials, work-based education and wild pollinators.

Workshops were offered on composting with worms, works of the Rise-Up Center, and roundtable discussions led by the Wilton Energy Committee and New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions.

Live music was provided throughout the event by Amy Conley and the Kukeleles, Bob Baker, Song of the Lark, Milford Contra Dance Band, Joelinda, Decatur Creek and storyteller Papa Joe.

At 5 p.m., people were invited to High Mowing School to hike around the Frye Farm fields and to stay for a session with the New Hampshire Astronomy Association for a view of the night sky.

The fair was sponsored by the Wilton Conservation Commission, and was funded by New England Grassroots Environmental Funds. Other promoters were W.S. Packaging, Nashua Regional Planning Commission, House by the Side of the Road, TDS Telecom, Wilton Energy Committee and Monadnock Water. The fair committee members were Sandy Lafleur, Alisha Demasi, Jennifer Beck, Alyana Vergo and Alison Meltzer.

The Souhegan Sustainability Fair is held by a nonprofit committee dedicated to more social and responsible living.

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