Honoring the fallen

People sometimes confuse Memorial Day with Veterans Day, both official United States holidays.

There is a difference. Memorial Day honors those who have died while serving in the armed forces, and therefore inspires more somber observances, while Veterans Day honors all veterans.

Memorial Day is always the last Monday in May, but local towns celebrate it on different days.

In Brookline on Saturday, May 23, veterans will replace flags at town cemeteries and will sell poppies at the transfer station from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. There will be a service at 9 a.m. Monday, May 25, in front of Town Hall. And at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 30, there will be a dedication of a headstone for properly destroyed flags at the Brookline Main Cemetery.

The Hollis observances are at 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 25, at Memorial Park on Broad Street, where Scouts will set wreaths under the direction of the post commander. After a march to the Town Common with the Hollis Town Band, there will be speeches, an announcement of essay contest winners, a historical narrative, the firing of volleys and a benediction, with a closing at 6:45 p.m.

If it rains, ceremonies will be in the Lawrence Barn.

In Merrimack, the parade on Monday, May 25, will step off at 11 a.m. sharp, VFW Cmdr. Max Quayle said, from the Merrimack Village Mall Shopping Center at 416 Daniel Webster Highway and march to the Last Rest Cemetery on Baboosic Lake Road, where there will be speeches at the Veterans Monument.

From there, the parade will go to the American Legion, where the Merrimack High School band will give a short concert after marching throughout the parade.

The parade will continue to the VFW at 282 Daniel Webster Highway, where six memorial plaques will be fastened to the wall to honor all veterans.

The parade will conclude at Veterans Park on Camp Sergeant Road, where Hayden Faust’s Eagle Scout project, a memorial to World War II veterans, will be dedicated.

Bedford’s Memorial Day parade is the town’s only big parade, and it goes all out, with floats and bands.

The parade will be held Sunday, May 24, with the theme “Saluting the Price of Freedom.” It will be a tribute to Earl Maynard Isham Jr., who served in the Navy during World War II from 1943-46 as gunner’s mate first class on the USS Taussig.

The parade will step off at 1 p.m. on Nashua Road, across from the Little League Complex, and march to County Road and up Liberty Hill Road. It will end at McKelvie Intermediate School, where vendors will sell refreshments.

New addition to the festivities will be a concert at the school featuring the Alumni Band of the New Hampshire National Guard, which will play at 2:30 p.m.

For more information, call Bedford Recreation Manager Jane O’Brien at 472-5242 or Gary Backus at the VFW at 488-1602.

In other towns:

? Amherst will have its annual sunset observance on Friday, May 29. The parade will step off on the Town Common at 6 p.m. and stop at four cemeteries and monuments. It will return to the common for ceremonies at 7.

? In Milford, the observance will be Monday, May 25, with the parade assembling at the West Street Cemetery at 10 a.m. Marchers go east on Elm Street, stopping on the bridge, and then proceed to the Milford Oval and then to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall off Mont Vernon Street.

? The Civil War ended 150 years ago, and Lyndeborough’s Lafayette Artillery Company will hold a ceremony to honor that anniversary during the town’s Memorial Day observances on Sunday, May 24.

As has been customary the last few years, “President Abraham Lincoln,” in the person of Steve Wood, of Claremont, will give the Gettysburg Address as part of the ceremonies on the Village Common.

“We’ll do the special service in conjunction with that,” Artillery Capt. Walter Holland said. “We want to honor all of the men from town who served.”

According to the town history, 110 men served, as well as other members of the Lafayette Artillery Company who were stationed for 90 days in Portsmouth.

Music will be provided by the Black River Fife and Drum Corps from Vermont.

The observances will begin at 9:30 a.m. in Lyndeborough Center with ceremonies in the Center Cemetery, followed by services in the South Cemetery. The parade will step off from Central School at 1 p.m., proceed along Forest Road (Route 31), and end at the common. The program will include patriotic readings and music.

The artillery company’s 1844 cannon will be fired after the ceremonies. Veterans present will be asked to pull the firing pin.

? In Wilton, American Legion Bent-Burke Post 10 will sponsor events on Monday, May 25. The parade, led by the Temple Band, will leave the post home at 9 a.m., follow the usual route through downtown and end in front of the war memorials on Forest Street. Marchers will include local veterans, the Legion color guard, Boy and Girl Scouts, and the Lafayette Artillery Company. After observances, the post home will be open for refreshments.

Honoring the fallen

People sometimes confuse Memorial Day with Veterans Day, both official United States holidays.

There is a difference. Memorial Day honors those who have died while serving in the armed forces, and therefore inspires more somber observances, while Veterans Day honors all veterans.

Memorial Day is always the last Monday in May, but local towns celebrate it on different days.

In Merrimack, the parade on Monday, May 25, will step off at 11 a.m. sharp, VFW Cmdr. Max Quayle said, from the Merrimack Village Mall Shopping Center at 416 Daniel Webster Highway and march to the Last Rest Cemetery on Baboosic Lake Road, where there will be speeches at the Veterans Monument.

From there, the parade will go to the American Legion, where the Merrimack High School band will give a short concert after marching throughout the parade.

The parade will continue to the VFW at 282 Daniel Webster Highway, where six memorial plaques will be fastened to the wall to honor all veterans.

The parade will conclude at Veterans Park on Camp Sergeant Road, where Hayden Faust’s Eagle Scout project, a memorial to World War II veterans, will be dedicated.

In Brookline on Saturday, May 23, veterans will replace flags at town cemeteries and will sell poppies at the transfer station from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. There will be a service at 9 a.m. Monday, May 25, in front of Town Hall. And at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 30, there will be a dedication of a headstone for properly destroyed flags at the Brookline Main Cemetery.

The Hollis observances are at 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 25, at Memorial Park on Broad Street, where Scouts will set wreaths under the direction of the post commander. After a march to the Town Common with the Hollis Town Band, there will be speeches, an announcement of essay contest winners, a historical narrative, the firing of volleys and a benediction, with a closing at 6:45 p.m.

If it rains, ceremonies will be in the Lawrence Barn.

Bedford’s Memorial Day parade is the town’s only big parade, and it goes all out, with floats and bands.

The parade will be held Sunday, May 24, with the theme “Saluting the Price of Freedom.” It will be a tribute to Earl Maynard Isham Jr., who served in the Navy during World War II from 1943-46 as gunner’s mate first class on the USS Taussig.

The parade will step off at 1 p.m. on Nashua Road, across from the Little League Complex, and march to County Road and up Liberty Hill Road. It will end at McKelvie Intermediate School, where vendors will sell refreshments.

New addition to the festivities will be a concert at the school featuring the Alumni Band of the New Hampshire National Guard, which will play at 2:30 p.m.

For more information, call Bedford Recreation Manager Jane O’Brien at 472-5242 or Gary Backus at the VFW at 488-1602.

In other towns:

? Amherst will have its annual sunset observance on Friday, May 29. The parade will step off on the Town Common at 6 p.m. and stop at four cemeteries and monuments. It will return to the common for ceremonies at 7.

? In Milford, the observance will be Monday, May 25, with the parade assembling at the West Street Cemetery at 10 a.m. Marchers go east on Elm Street, stopping on the bridge, and then proceed to the Milford Oval and then to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall off Mont Vernon Street.

? The Civil War ended 150 years ago, and Lyndeborough’s Lafayette Artillery Company will hold a ceremony to honor that anniversary during the town’s Memorial Day observances on Sunday, May 24.

As has been customary the last few years, “President Abraham Lincoln,” in the person of Steve Wood, of Claremont, will give the Gettysburg Address as part of the ceremonies on the Village Common.

“We’ll do the special service in conjunction with that,” Artillery Capt. Walter Holland said. “We want to honor all of the men from town who served.”

According to the town history, 110 men served, as well as other members of the Lafayette Artillery Company who were stationed for 90 days in Portsmouth.

Music will be provided by the Black River Fife and Drum Corps from Vermont.

The observances will begin at 9:30 a.m. in Lyndeborough Center with ceremonies in the Center Cemetery, followed by services in the South Cemetery. The parade will step off from Central School at 1 p.m., proceed along Forest Road (Route 31), and end at the common. The program will include patriotic readings and music.

The artillery company’s 1844 cannon will be fired after the ceremonies. Veterans present will be asked to pull the firing pin.

? In Wilton, American Legion Bent-Burke Post 10 will sponsor events on Monday, May 25. The parade, led by the Temple Band, will leave the post home at 9 a.m., follow the usual route through downtown and end in front of the war memorials on Forest Street. Marchers will include local veterans, the Legion color guard, Boy and Girl Scouts, and the Lafayette Artillery Company. After observances, the post home will be open for refreshments.