Scary fun at Fright Kingdom

Tim Dunne’s crew wants to know how many Walkers you’ve killed.

Even if you aren’t a big fan of the television series "The Walking Dead" and its resident zombies, or "Walkers," go along with the actors playing the part of soldiers on the lookout for the hungry undead. It’s all for fun and a good scare at Fright Kingdom in its 11th season.

The haunted destination, which has five themed attractions – including Apocolypse Z, a mock military installation and haven from a roaming zombie horde – has grown to fill 150,000 square feet at 12 Simon St., a frightfully long way from its 15,000 square feet beginning of what Dunne calls a "mom and pop" Halloween attraction.

Dunne, who operates Dunne’s Demolition when he isn’t working to scare the dickens out of fright fans, found his inspiration in Disney World’s premiere spook house attraction as a kid.

Growing up in Florida, the park was a destination for school-age kids holding complimentary passes. While all of the other kids headed to ride the roller coaster at Space Mountain, "I’d be by myself going to the Haunted Mansion," Dunne said.

His infatuation grew, and has led to a serious semi-career scaring the daylights out of people. Deadly serious. So much so that a 2007 video audition led him to win a coveted chance to be a butler at Disney’s Haunted Mansion in the company’s Dream Job contest.

Dunne got training in costuming, makeup and other elements behind good production development, which he has turned into his popular local haunted attraction.

"As soon as people come in the parking lot, it’s game on," he said.

Sometimes they’re so scared that they leave before getting into the building.

"It’s a fine line," Dunne said.

There are five themes that make up this year’s Fright Kingdom destination, including the zombie apocalypse scenario.

There’s Bloodmare Manor, "a quintessential haunted house," said Dunne, and an old favorite that adds new features yearly to the Victorian home inhabited by a family of cannibals.

The attraction’s Psyco Circus has patrons wear 3-D glasses to watch the performers.

Another area of the tour, simply called Grim, isn’t about what’s there. It’s about what isn’t there. Complete darkness is the catalyst for the experience, puncuated by whispers and other tactile elements that Dunne doesn’t want revealed in advance.

The tomblike Castle of Corpses has been revamped with new creatures and a mineshaft-like walk.

This is all after arriving and, if so inclined, trading steps with dancing zombie girls in the parking lot. Once inside the midway area, each visitor gets a card with a particular Halloween icon. People can enjoy the concessions, and take selfies with roaming spooks and creatures.

"It’s a party atmosphere," Dunne said.

He works to avoid long lines at individual attractions. People with matching pictures form groups, which once called, are sent in to tour the attractions.

The format "works very well for us," he said.

It isn’t just a busy October for Dunne and his crew of about 100 employees, who range from concession workers and parking attendants to actors.

"We start hard core in June," Dunne said.

Feedback from patrons is absorbed and team member reviews are held nightly after the attraction closes.

"We’re already planning for next year," Dunne said. "It’s year-round. It doesn’t stop."

Dunne praises his team, some of whom have many years in the fright business industry.

"Our team continues to grow every year," he said.

"They all love Halloween. The direction it’s going blows me away."

Don Himsel can be reached at 594-6590, dhimsel@
nashuatelegraph.com or at @Telegraph_DonH.

Scary fun at Fright Kingdom

Tim Dunne’s crew wants to know how many Walkers you’ve killed.

Even if you aren’t a big fan of the television series "The Walking Dead" and its resident zombies, or "Walkers," go along with the actors playing the part of soldiers on the lookout for the hungry undead. It’s all for fun and a good scare at Fright Kingdom in its 11th season.

The haunted destination, which has five themed attractions – including Apocolypse Z, a mock military installation and haven from a roaming zombie horde – has grown to fill 150,000 square feet at 12 Simon St., a frightfully long way from its 15,000 square feet beginning of what Dunne calls a "mom and pop" Halloween attraction.

Dunne, who operates Dunne’s Demolition when he isn’t working to scare the dickens out of fright fans, found his inspiration in Disney World’s premiere spook house attraction as a kid.

Growing up in Florida, the park was a destination for school-age kids holding complimentary passes. While all of the other kids headed to ride the roller coaster at Space Mountain, "I’d be by myself going to the Haunted Mansion," Dunne said.

His infatuation grew, and has led to a serious semi-career scaring the daylights out of people. Deadly serious. So much so that a 2007 video audition led him to win a coveted chance to be a butler at Disney’s Haunted Mansion in the company’s Dream Job contest.

Dunne got training in costuming, makeup and other elements behind good production development, which he has turned into his popular local haunted attraction.

"As soon as people come in the parking lot, it’s game on," he said.

Sometimes they’re so scared that they leave before getting into the building.

"It’s a fine line," Dunne said.

There are five themes that make up this year’s Fright Kingdom destination, including the zombie apocalypse scenario.

There’s Bloodmare Manor, "a quintessential haunted house," said Dunne, and an old favorite that adds new features yearly to the Victorian home inhabited by a family of cannibals.

The attraction’s Psyco Circus has patrons wear 3-D glasses to watch the performers.

Another area of the tour, simply called Grim, isn’t about what’s there. It’s about what isn’t there. Complete darkness is the catalyst for the experience, puncuated by whispers and other tactile elements that Dunne doesn’t want revealed in advance.

The tomblike Castle of Corpses has been revamped with new creatures and a mineshaft-like walk.

This is all after arriving and, if so inclined, trading steps with dancing zombie girls in the parking lot. Once inside the midway area, each visitor gets a card with a particular Halloween icon. People can enjoy the concessions, and take selfies with roaming spooks and creatures.

"It’s a party atmosphere," Dunne said.

He works to avoid long lines at individual attractions. People with matching pictures form groups, which once called, are sent in to tour the attractions.

The format "works very well for us," he said.

It isn’t just a busy October for Dunne and his crew of about 100 employees, who range from concession workers and parking attendants to actors.

"We start hard core in June," Dunne said.

Feedback from patrons is absorbed and team member reviews are held nightly after the attraction closes.

"We’re already planning for next year," Dunne said. "It’s year-round. It doesn’t stop."

Dunne praised his team, some of whom have many years in the fright business industry.

"Our team continues to grow every year," he said.

"They all love Halloween. The direction it’s going blows me away."

Don Himsel can be reached at 594-6590, dhimsel@nashua
telegraph.com or @Telegraph_DonH.

Scary fun at Fright Kingdom

Tim Dunne’s crew wants to know how many Walkers you’ve killed.

Even if you aren’t a big fan of the television series "The Walking Dead" and its resident zombies, or "Walkers," go along with the actors playing the part of soldiers on the lookout for the hungry undead. It’s all for fun and a good scare at Fright Kingdom in its 11th season.

The haunted destination, which has five themed attractions – including Apocolypse Z, a mock military installation and haven from a roaming zombie horde – has grown to fill 150,000 square feet at 12 Simon St., a frightfully long way from its 15,000 square feet beginning of what Dunne calls a "mom and pop" Halloween attraction.

Dunne, who operates Dunne’s Demolition when he isn’t working to scare the dickens out of fright fans, found his inspiration in Disney World’s premiere spook house attraction as a kid.

Growing up in Florida, the park was a destination for school-age kids holding complimentary passes. While all of the other kids headed to ride the roller coaster at Space Mountain, "I’d be by myself going to the Haunted Mansion," Dunne said.

His infatuation grew, and has led to a serious semi-career scaring the daylights out of people. Deadly serious. So much so that a 2007 video audition led him to win a coveted chance to be a butler at Disney’s Haunted Mansion in the company’s Dream Job contest.

Dunne got training in costuming, makeup and other elements behind good production development, which he has turned into his popular local haunted attraction.

"As soon as people come in the parking lot, it’s game on," he said.

Sometimes they’re so scared that they leave before getting into the building.

"It’s a fine line," Dunne said.

There are five themes that make up this year’s Fright Kingdom destination, including the zombie apocalypse scenario.

There’s Bloodmare Manor, "a quintessential haunted house," said Dunne, and an old favorite that adds new features yearly to the Victorian home inhabited by a family of cannibals.

The attraction’s Psyco Circus has patrons wear 3-D glasses to watch the performers.

Another area of the tour, simply called Grim, isn’t about what’s there. It’s about what isn’t there. Complete darkness is the catalyst for the experience, puncuated by whispers and other tactile elements that Dunne doesn’t want revealed in advance.

The tomblike Castle of Corpses has been revamped with new creatures and a mineshaft-like walk.

This is all after arriving and, if so inclined, trading steps with dancing zombie girls in the parking lot. Once inside the midway area, each visitor gets a card with a particular Halloween icon. People can enjoy the concessions, and take selfies with roaming spooks and creatures.

"It’s a party atmosphere," Dunne said.

He works to avoid long lines at individual attractions. People with matching pictures form groups, which once called, are sent in to tour the attractions.

The format "works very well for us," he said.

It isn’t just a busy October for Dunne and his crew of about 100 employees, who range from concession workers and parking attendants to actors.

"We start hard core in June," Dunne said.

Feedback from patrons is absorbed and team member reviews are held nightly after the attraction closes.

"We’re already planning for next year," Dunne said. "It’s year-round. It doesn’t stop."

Dunne praised his team, some of whom have many years in the fright business industry.

"Our team continues to grow every year," he said.

"They all love Halloween. The direction it’s going blows me away."

Don Himsel can be reached at 594-6590, dhimsel@nashua
telegraph.com or @Telegraph_DonH.