Help with nuisance wildlife available

CONCORD – Do you have mice in the attic, squirrels in the rafters or raccoons looking for a warm bunk in your barn?

Fall and early winter find many New Hampshire residents actively seeking ways to deal with uninvited wildlife at their residences. Help is just a few clicks away thanks to wildlifehelp.org, a website built to assist with wildlife damage issues.

The website is supported by the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Northeast Wildlife Damage Management Cooperative. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia are represented, with wildlife species and damage control information specific to managing wildlife in those jurisdictions.

Wildlifehelp.org is designed to assist with common wildlife problems presenting solutions to resolve those conflicts. The website offers several ways to obtain information about a wildlife damage conflict, such as animal identification, solutions and ideas to prevent damage caused by animals, and a listing of professional nuisance wildlife control operators to call when assistance beyond the basics is necessary.

"This time of year, we’re getting lots of calls from people needing help with everything from beavers building dams on their property to red squirrels in their attics," says Mark Ellingwood, New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Division chief. "Wildlifehelp.org gives them a start with great information on how to deal with nuisance wildlife, and is a place to go for basic information."

More help combating nuisance wildlife can also be obtained by calling USDA/Wildlife Service at 223-6832.

Help with nuisance wildlife available

CONCORD – Do you have mice in the attic, squirrels in the rafters or raccoons looking for a warm bunk in your barn?

Fall and early winter find many New Hampshire residents actively seeking ways to deal with uninvited wildlife at their residences. Help is just a few clicks away thanks to wildlifehelp.org, a website built to assist with wildlife damage issues.

The website is supported by the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Northeast Wildlife Damage Management Cooperative. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia are represented, with wildlife species and damage control information specific to managing wildlife in those jurisdictions.

Wildlifehelp.org is designed to assist with common wildlife problems presenting solutions to resolve those conflicts. The website offers several ways to obtain information about a wildlife damage conflict, such as animal identification, solutions and ideas to prevent damage caused by animals, and a listing of professional nuisance wildlife control operators to call when assistance beyond the basics is necessary.

"This time of year, we’re getting lots of calls from people needing help with everything from beavers building dams on their property to red squirrels in their attics," says Mark Ellingwood, New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Division chief. "Wildlifehelp.org gives them a start with great information on how to deal with nuisance wildlife, and is a place to go for basic information."

More help combating nuisance wildlife can also be obtained by calling USDA/Wildlife Service at 223-6832.

Help with nuisance wildlife available

CONCORD – Do you have mice in the attic, squirrels in the rafters or raccoons looking for a warm bunk in your barn?

Fall and early winter find many New Hampshire residents actively seeking ways to deal with uninvited wildlife at their residences. Help is just a few clicks away thanks to wildlifehelp.org, a website built to assist with wildlife damage issues.

The website is supported by the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Northeast Wildlife Damage Management Cooperative. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia are represented, with wildlife species and damage control information specific to managing wildlife in those jurisdictions.

Wildlifehelp.org is designed to assist with common wildlife problems presenting solutions to resolve those conflicts. The website offers several ways to obtain information about a wildlife damage conflict, such as animal identification, solutions and ideas to prevent damage caused by animals, and a listing of professional nuisance wildlife control operators to call when assistance beyond the basics is necessary.

"This time of year, we’re getting lots of calls from people needing help with everything from beavers building dams on their property to red squirrels in their attics," says Mark Ellingwood, New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Division chief. "Wildlifehelp.org gives them a start with great information on how to deal with nuisance wildlife, and is a place to go for basic information."

More help combating nuisance wildlife can also be obtained by calling USDA/Wildlife Service at 223-6832.