Merrimack Girl Scout earns Silver Award with Bedford project

MERRIMACK – Sarah Heimberg, a 14-year-old Girl Scout from Merrimack, has earned her Silver Award.

Over the last year, Sarah has worked with residents at Carlyle Place of Bedford to provide performances, music therapy and iPods in a project called "Project Grace Notes: Music Therapy for Senior Citizens."

Sarah, an avid trumpet player and singer, spent more than 50 hours performing for residents, researching Alzheimer’s disease, collecting iPods and running a music therapy group. She learned that music is a great way to help Alzheimer’s patients with mood, memory and attention, and decided to play music that would help the residents at Carlyle Place with brain functionality.

Her set list included favorites such as "You Are My Sunshine," "Moon River" and "Oh Danny Boy." Her favorite part of the performances was watching faces light up when people knew the songs and began to sing along.

Sarah collected more than a dozen gently used iPods to donate to the residents. Each was loaded with a playlist tailored to the interests of Carlyle Place residents.

Through this project, Sarah discovered that musical improvisation is a great way to help dementia patients regain memory, emotions and have overall improved mental performance. She ran a music therapy session to encourage the residents to play their own improvisation on percussive instruments such as maracas and egg shakers.

On Nov. 14, Sarah was recognized at the Young Women of Distinction Awards Ceremony for her project.

Although she has completed the project, Sarah plans to still perform at Carlyle Place.

"It was such a wonderful place to perform that I feel like I have to go back," she said. "I love playing there, and I love the feeling that I get from doing so."

Merrimack Girl Scout earns Silver Award with Bedford project

MERRIMACK – Sarah Heimberg, a 14-year-old Girl Scout from Merrimack, has earned her Silver Award.

Over the last year, Sarah has worked with residents at Carlyle Place of Bedford to provide performances, music therapy and iPods in a project called "Project Grace Notes: Music Therapy for Senior Citizens."

Sarah, an avid trumpet player and singer, spent more than 50 hours performing for residents, researching Alzheimer’s disease, collecting iPods and running a music therapy group. She learned that music is a great way to help Alzheimer’s patients with mood, memory and attention, and decided to play music that would help the residents at Carlyle Place with brain functionality.

Her set list included favorites such as "You Are My Sunshine," "Moon River" and "Oh Danny Boy." Her favorite part of the performances was watching faces light up when people knew the songs and began to sing along.

Sarah collected more than a dozen gently used iPods to donate to the residents. Each was loaded with a playlist tailored to the interests of Carlyle Place residents.

Through this project, Sarah discovered that musical improvisation is a great way to help dementia patients regain memory, emotions and have overall improved mental performance. She ran a music therapy session to encourage the residents to play their own improvisation on percussive instruments such as maracas and egg shakers.

On Nov. 14, Sarah was recognized at the Young Women of Distinction Awards Ceremony for her project.

Although she has completed the project, Sarah plans to still perform at Carlyle Place.

"It was such a wonderful place to perform that I feel like I have to go back," she said. "I love playing there, and I love the feeling that I get from doing so."

Merrimack Girl Scout earns Silver Award with Bedford project

MERRIMACK – Sarah Heimberg, a 14-year-old Girl Scout from Merrimack, has earned her Silver Award.

Over the last year, Sarah has worked with residents at Carlyle Place of Bedford to provide performances, music therapy and iPods in a project called "Project Grace Notes: Music Therapy for Senior Citizens."

Sarah, an avid trumpet player and singer, spent more than 50 hours performing for residents, researching Alzheimer’s disease, collecting iPods and running a music therapy group. She learned that music is a great way to help Alzheimer’s patients with mood, memory and attention, and decided to play music that would help the residents at Carlyle Place with brain functionality.

Her set list included favorites such as "You Are My Sunshine," "Moon River" and "Oh Danny Boy." Her favorite part of the performances was watching faces light up when people knew the songs and began to sing along.

Sarah collected more than a dozen gently used iPods to donate to the residents. Each was loaded with a playlist tailored to the interests of Carlyle Place residents.

Through this project, Sarah discovered that musical improvisation is a great way to help dementia patients regain memory, emotions and have overall improved mental performance. She ran a music therapy session to encourage the residents to play their own improvisation on percussive instruments such as maracas and egg shakers.

On Nov. 14, Sarah was recognized at the Young Women of Distinction Awards Ceremony for her project.

Although she has completed the project, Sarah plans to still perform at Carlyle Place.

"It was such a wonderful place to perform that I feel like I have to go back," she said. "I love playing there, and I love the feeling that I get from doing so."