Council’s Scouting Museum reopens in new location

MANCHESTER – The Lawrence L. Lee Scouting Museum and Max I. Silber Scouting Library is celebrating the 106th anniversary of the founding of the Boy Scouts of America with the move to a new space within Camp Carpenter.

The museum had suspended operations for nearly a year in order to accomplish the build-out of the new space and the relocation of the thousands of artifacts and books that comprise one of the largest collections of Boy and Girl Scouting artifacts in the country.

Originally established in 1969 in a wooded cabin on the shore of Long Pond in East Manchester, the museum collection is now housed in half of the ground floor of the 12-year-old Center for Character Development at Camp Carpenter, off Bodwell Road, at 300 Blondin Road.

The original collection was the idea of legendary New Hampshire Scouter Max Silber, and was constructed as a tribute to Lawrence Lee, the first council executive of Daniel Webster Council.

Although the charm of a cabin in the woods has been replaced, the new location includes many amenities that the museum never had.

Dick Zeloski, chairman of the all-volunteer committee that administrates the collection and runs the museum, said, "The addition of running water and a modern fire-suppression system were among the greatest new features of the move. But we also now have the advantages of better insulated space, which benefits the heating, air conditioning and humidity control that is important to historical artifacts.

"We are now in the direct traffic pattern of virtually every visitor to camp, right next door to the Scout Store, where Scouts, parents and unit leaders purchase uniforms, awards and other trappings of their Scouting experience."

The museum is home to an extensive collection of original Scout uniforms dating all the way to the founding of the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. Many items owned by, dedicated to or created by Lord Robert-Baden Powell, the founder of Scouting worldwide, are also on display.

It houses representative objects from all of the national and world jamborees, historic camping equipment, thousands of patches, postage stamps featuring Scouts from around the world and more.

Docents offer both a Boy Scout and Cub Scout version of a scavenger hunt as a fun way for Scouts to explore the rich history of the movement.

"We’ve got something that very few other councils nationwide have, and we think ours is one of the best there is," said Don Shepard, the council executive and CEO of the Daniel Webster Council. "The volunteer committee which runs the operation has worked tirelessly, investing thousands of man-hours to create the new space and move the collection, sometimes hand-carrying the most valuable items across the parking lot in camp.

"We welcome visitors from far and wide to come and enjoy the museum."

The Scouting Museum and Library are open most Saturdays (except holiday weekends) from September through mid-June. Additional weekdays are added to accommodate the summer programs at Camp Carpenter. Donations of artifacts or monetary support are always welcome, as are new members to the museum committee.

For more information or to schedule a group visit, contact Joe Biedrzycki, volunteer coordinator, at studobnh@myfairpoint.net or 582-8757.

The new phone number at the museum is 965-2845.

Council’s Scouting Museum reopens in new location

MANCHESTER – The Lawrence L. Lee Scouting Museum and Max I. Silber Scouting Library is celebrating the 106th anniversary of the founding of the Boy Scouts of America with the move to a new space within Camp Carpenter.

The museum had suspended operations for nearly a year in order to accomplish the build-out of the new space and the relocation of the thousands of artifacts and books that comprise one of the largest collections of Boy and Girl Scouting artifacts in the country.

Originally established in 1969 in a wooded cabin on the shore of Long Pond in East Manchester, the museum collection is now housed in half of the ground floor of the 12-year-old Center for Character Development at Camp Carpenter, off Bodwell Road, at 300 Blondin Road.

The original collection was the idea of legendary New Hampshire Scouter Max Silber, and was constructed as a tribute to Lawrence Lee, the first council executive of Daniel Webster Council.

Although the charm of a cabin in the woods has been replaced, the new location includes many amenities that the museum never had.

Dick Zeloski, chairman of the all-volunteer committee that administrates the collection and runs the museum, said, "The addition of running water and a modern fire-suppression system were among the greatest new features of the move. But we also now have the advantages of better insulated space, which benefits the heating, air conditioning and humidity control that is important to historical artifacts.

"We are now in the direct traffic pattern of virtually every visitor to camp, right next door to the Scout Store, where Scouts, parents and unit leaders purchase uniforms, awards and other trappings of their Scouting experience."

The museum is home to an extensive collection of original Scout uniforms dating all the way to the founding of the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. Many items owned by, dedicated to or created by Lord Robert-Baden Powell, the founder of Scouting worldwide, are also on display.

It houses representative objects from all of the national and world jamborees, historic camping equipment, thousands of patches, postage stamps featuring Scouts from around the world and more.

Docents offer both a Boy Scout and Cub Scout version of a scavenger hunt as a fun way for Scouts to explore the rich history of the movement.

"We’ve got something that very few other councils nationwide have, and we think ours is one of the best there is," said Don Shepard, the council executive and CEO of the Daniel Webster Council. "The volunteer committee which runs the operation has worked tirelessly, investing thousands of man-hours to create the new space and move the collection, sometimes hand-carrying the most valuable items across the parking lot in camp.

"We welcome visitors from far and wide to come and enjoy the museum."

The Scouting Museum and Library are open most Saturdays (except holiday weekends) from September through mid-June. Additional weekdays are added to accommodate the summer programs at Camp Carpenter. Donations of artifacts or monetary support are always welcome, as are new members to the museum committee.

For more information or to schedule a group visit, contact Joe Biedrzycki, volunteer coordinator, at studobnh@myfairpoint.net or 582-8757.

The new phone number at the museum is 965-2845.