Is Generation Z solely digital?

(BPT) – All students heading back to school this year are part of the new generation known as Gen Z. Born in the years of 1995-2012, this group is defined by the fact that they grew up with a widespread usage of technology from a very young age. Laptops, software, apps and digital devices have granted them powerful tools to access nearly the entire bank of human knowledge. However, it is important to understand this generation is not solely digital, as studies have found handwriting and analog tools remain important elements of communication when it comes to learning.

According to a recent study commissioned by the Post-it Brand, 85 percent of Gen Z students feel they learn best when they use both digital and non-digital tools for schoolwork.

The study underlines how this group lives in a "phigital" world, a term coined by David Stillman, who is an author, speaker and expert on Gen Z. That is, physical and digital. He finds "Gen Z students are adept and fluent with technology, yet they still value and see the benefits of non-digital practices such as writing things down with pen and paper and especially communicating face-to-face."

His son, Jonah Stillman, a 17-year old high school student who writes and speaks about Gen Z, agrees, "I can’t imagine life without technology, as I use it throughout the day, even at school. However, when I’m studying for that big test or trying to remember something from class, I find

Is Generation Z solely digital?

(BPT) – All students heading back to school this year are part of the new generation known as Gen Z. Born in the years of 1995-2012, this group is defined by the fact that they grew up with a widespread usage of technology from a very young age. Laptops, software, apps and digital devices have granted them powerful tools to access nearly the entire bank of human knowledge. However, it is important to understand this generation is not solely digital, as studies have found handwriting and analog tools remain important elements of communication when it comes to learning.

According to a recent study commissioned by the Post-it Brand, 85 percent of Gen Z students feel they learn best when they use both digital and non-digital tools for schoolwork.

The study underlines how this group lives in a "phigital" world, a term coined by David Stillman, who is an author, speaker and expert on Gen Z. That is, physical and digital. He finds "Gen Z students are adept and fluent with technology, yet they still value and see the benefits of non-digital practices such as writing things down with pen and paper and especially communicating face-to-face."

His son, Jonah Stillman, a 17-year old high school student who writes and speaks about Gen Z, agrees, "I can’t imagine life without technology, as I use it throughout the day, even at school. However, when I’m studying for that big test or trying to remember something from class, I find